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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE-Oct. 3 2018

MEDIA CONTACT:

Sarah Reyes
W: (559) 443-5306
C: (559) 470-4545 sreyes@calendow.org

Press Release

COMMON AND THE HOPE & REDEMPTION TOUR HIT THE ROAD AGAIN IN OCTOBER
The Tour includes a series of special live musical performances inside prisons along with community activationsthroughout California’s Central Valley

Oct. 2, 2018 — Los Angeles, CA — Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy and Grammy-winning artist, actor and activist Common will embark again on the Hope & Redemption Tour alongside his new nonprofit organization Imagine Justice. Imagine Justice’s Hope & Redemption Tour: Central Valley will take place from Oct. 10 – 13.

“This work and this Tour is deeply rooted in my love for people and my commitment to helping create a world where we all can thrive. I believe that all of us deserve the tools, access, resources and opportunities neededto navigate our lives and cultivate our best selves,” said Common.

Starting on Oct. 10, Common will visit and perform inside three different prisons in three days throughout California’s Central Valley to instill hope, love and humanity in the men and women who are incarcerated. In addition to the live concerts in various correctional facilities, Common will take part in a series of community events to engage, build with and inspire local communities and organizations, including a town hall with youthleaders in Bakersfield, a speaking engagement at Fresno City College and a #SchoolsNotPrisons event inMerced. The Tour will conclude on Oct. 13 with a special visit to a California Division of Juvenile Justice youth facility and a meeting in Stockton with Mayor Michael Tubbs and local community leaders.

“I’m very grateful to go on this journey again to instill hope in our brothers and sisters who are incarcerated and engage youth leaders in California as we go on Imagine Justice’s Hope & Redemption Tour: CentralValley,” said Common.

The Tour is supported by the Anti-Recidivism Coalition and The California Endowment’s Building HealthyCommunities initiative centered on community power building for health and racial justice in South Kern County, Fresno, Merced, Stockton and other communities throughout the state.

“We’re proud to join Common in lifting up the Central Valley’s youth leaders and their bold vision for a healthier and more just California,” said Robert K. Ross, President and CEO of The California Endowment. “Weshare his commitment to justice, both in communities and inside prisons where hope lights the way toward apositive future.”

ABOUT THE HOPE & REDEMPTION TOUR Common dedicated countless hours advocating for criminal justice reform, engaging with local communities and instilling hope in the men and women inside prison as part of his Hope & Redemption Tour that started in 2017. On March 28-31, Common kicked off the Tour by playing three shows in three different prisons in four days. In August, Common hosted a special free community concert, Imagine Justice, on the grounds of the Capitol building in Sacramento with J. Cole, Andra Day, Ledisi, Goapele and more to advocate for criminal justice reform for an audience of over 25,000 people. The next day,Common joined multiple organizations in the State Capitol for several meetings with the governor, numerous caucuses and other legislators to discuss a number of bills that were all eventually signed into law in September. Following his visit to the State Capitol, Common traveled to Folsom State Prison and Lancaster State Prison to perform for the men in prison.

ABOUT IMAGINE JUSTICE Centered at the intersection of art and activism, Imagine Justice is dedicated to leveraging the power of art to advocate for communities around the country, to fight for justice and equalityand to stand united against injustice wherever it appears. Common’s newly founded Imagine Justice will focus on criminal justice reform, coalition/community building, immigration, bringing humanity to communities who are often dehumanized in society, civic engagement and leveraging the power of art to inspire and spark change. Follow Imagine Justice on Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook.

ABOUT THE CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT The California Endowment, a private statewide health foundation, was established in 1996 to expand access to quality health care for underserved individuals andcommunities, and to provide fundamental affordable improvements in the health status of all Californians.Headquartered in downtown Los Angeles, The Endowment has regional offices in Sacramento, Oakland, Fresno and San Diego, with program staff working throughout the state. The Endowment challenges theconventional wisdom that medical settings and individual choices are solely responsible for people’s health.Through its Health Happens Here campaign and 10-year initiative for Building Healthy Communities, The Endowment is creating places where children are healthy, safe and ready to learn. At its core, The Endowment believes that health happens in neighborhoods, schools and with prevention. For moreinformation, visit The California Endowment’s homepage at www.calendow.org.

ABOUT ANTI-RECIDIVISM COALITION The mission of the Anti-Recidivism Coalition (ARC) is to change lives and create safe, healthy communities by providing a support and advocacy network for, and comprised of, formerly incarcerated young men and women. To accomplish this mission, ARC advocates for fair policies in the juvenile and criminal justice systems and provides a supportive network and reentry services to formerlyincarcerated individuals. In addition to peer support, ARC offers wraparound services, including casemanagement, trauma counseling, housing, education and employment assistance, mentorship, and opportunities for civic engagement. Today, ARC serves more than 1000 formerly incarcerated men and women. For more information, see www.antirecidivism.org.

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On Saturday May 12, Greenfield residents celebrated murals that were added to the community building in Rexland Acres Park over the past year. Responding to a call from the Arts Council of Kern in August 2017, community members were asked for input on mural content. Following many months of work by artists Carlos De Guzman, Jorge Guillen, and Garrett Memering, community members’ concepts were unveiled in completion.

Building Healthy Communities South Kern’s Education Justice Collaborative launched a media campaign to inform parents how the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) impacts their children. The campaign encourages parents to be familiar with their district’s Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) and provide feedback about the plan, which outlines how dollars will be used to student outcomes, to their school district. Look for our ads on billboards, local buses, and digital signs!

Yesenia Ocampo from California Walks, along with youth from South Kern, were selected to present at this year’s American Public Health Association’s (APHA) annual conference. Their presentation “Youth Voices for a Healthy, Safe, & Active California” fits squarely with APHA’s conference theme this year: Creating the Healthiest Nation: Health Equity Now”. They will be sharing local work at an event with more than 12,000 attendees! Congratulations!

Joining over 21 localities across California, the City of Arvin signed-on to an amicus curiae (“friend of the court”) brief that was filed on Friday May 18, 2018 urging the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California to uphold Senate Bill 54, the California Values Act, and two related State laws against an attack by the federal government.
At its May 15, 2018 meeting, the Arvin City Council authorized Mayor Jose Gurrola and the City Attorney to sign-on to the brief, which was co-authored by the Santa Clara County Counsel’s Office, the City of Oakland, and the County of Los Angeles.
Speaking on SB 54’s impact on Arvin’s public safety, Mayor Gurrola said, “President Trump and Attorney General Sessions’ anti-immigrant policies and attacks on SB 54 further undermines the public’s trust in our criminal justice system and makes law enforcement’s job more difficult. I’m proud to join leaders from across the state to stand up for our values and public safety against the ill-advised attacks from President Trump.”
“The people in our city, our state, and the entire country deserve to feel safe regardless of their immigration or citizenship status. Ensuring that everyone feels safe and comfortable enough to reach out to law enforcement when they need help is essential to public safety everywhere. If our national government refuses to see the importance in this, it is up to the rest of us to do what we can to make it happen,” said Arvin City Councilmember Jazmin Robles.
Other geographies signing the brief included: City of Albany, City of Berkeley, City of Culver City, City of Davis, City of East Palo Alto, County of Marin, County of Monterey, City of Morgan Hill, City of Mountain View, City of Palm Springs, City of Richmond, City of Sacramento, City of San Diego, City of San José, City of Santa Ana, County of Santa Cruz, City of Santa Monica, County of Sonoma, City of Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and City of West Hollywood.
An estimated 1 million Californians drink unsafe water at home, school, or in public places. Californians deserve water that is safe to drink, free from toxins. Kern County residents have joined forces with other Californians across the State to reach that goal. On May 11, the Dolores Huerta Foundation hosted an event in downtown Bakersfield in support of Governor Brown’s Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund. And last week more than 100 San Joaquin Valley residents meet with Sacramento legislators to share their stories about how unsafe drinking water impacts their families and their communities.
Governor Brown has asked the State legislature to enact a statewide tax on drinking water to treat unsafe wells and treatment systems. The proposed tax is expected to be voted on this summer and requires a two-thirds majority to pass. The projected cost per person would be $11.40 each year.
On Wednesday May 9th, the US Census Bureau and California Complete Count staff hosted a Regional Readiness Assessment Convening at the Beale Library. Rolling out the timeline for the 2020 census, the speakers shared changes in the administration of the census, the need for local organizations and individuals to collaborate to ensure hard to reach populations are counted, and employment opportunities for local residents.
At this point, the focus is on outreach to hard to reach populations, starting with assembling a diverse network of local organizations that will work together with their respective constituencies to get the word out that every Californian needs to be counted. Without an accurate count, California and Kern County will not receive adequate funding for public services such as schools, health care, and infrastructure. Even our voice at the national level is impacted because the Census count determines how many Representatives California has in Congress. In addition, many Census-related job opportunities will be available for Kern residents over the next two years; ranging from management positions to door-to-door neighborhood canvasing teams. For the first time, an electronic version of the census will be available, allowing individuals to complete the information on-line. Stay tuned as we near 2020!

By Ja’Nell Gore, South Kern Sol

Every year, some local high schools have assemblies recognizing Cinco de Mayo – a holiday largely ignored in Mexico, but held up in America as a day to celebrate Mexican culture with piñatas, tacos and a lot of alcohol. Meanwhile, throughout the whole month of February, my high school has done nothing to commemorate Black History Month.

Schools should be doing something to show appreciation, or even just acknowledge the evolution of black history – but at Bakersfield High School, nothing like that happened last month.

I would have loved to attend an assembly where they focused on my culture and history, opening the eyes of kids who know little about it.

And this desire of mine isn’t uncalled for, especially in a district that has acknowledged it engaged in a years-long practice of disproportionately suspending and expelling minority students, including African Americans. The district was sued, settling the lawsuit last year for more than $670,000. Among the settlement terms? The district must recognize Black History Month and allow students to celebrate.

Instead of taking initiative and organizing such a celebration, they are leaving it up to students. Considering that most students have never planned a school event (or don’t even know they have the option) why would they ‘leave it to the kids’?

Building Healthy Communities Kern in partnership with South Kern Sol youth media, have launched a new youth-produced webcast. “In the 661” will present stories, current events and good work happening in the community- all through a lens of health and racial equity.The show not only gives youth the opportunity to learn about what it takes to produce a video segment, but it also gives young journalists the opportunity to lift up issues that matter to them and might otherwise go untold.

There’s a lot of good work happening across the community, but rarely do organizations or residents who are working to improve community health have the opportunity to amplify their voice via mainstream media.

This show gives residents and organizations the opportunity to examine health in interesting and innovative ways. Health doesn’t only happen in a doctor’s office. Health happens where we work live and play. Health happens when people tap into their power, work together and change the odds in their neighborhoods.

The show will be aired weekly on “In the 661’s” Facebook page and will be shared widely on Building Healthy Communities Kern’s website and social media platforms.

The new show is produced by South Kern Sol youth reporters, Alejandra Alberto, Dean Welliver, Marilu Cisneros, and Veronica Morley and hosted by former KGET news anchor, Kiyoshi Tomono.

By Dean Welliver, South Kern Sol

The Third Annual LGBTQ Youth Summit hosted by the Kern County LGBTQ Youth Roundtable was held this past Saturday at Cal State Bakersfield. The summit offered middle school and high school aged LGBTQ youth a space where they could be themselves without judgement, make new friends, and learn about the resources that are in the community to support them.

“The goal of the event is to bring the LGBTQ community of Kern County together and to ensure young people who identify as being part of the community do not feel isolated,” said Gloria Garcia, lead organizer of the event and LGBT Community Worker at California Rural Legal Assistance.

To Julian Melendez, a senior at Foothill High School, the LGBTQ Youth Summit provided an opportunity for LGBTQ youth to connect to their culture.

“It gives a lot of youth a lot of information that they didn’t receive in school and this way we interact with our own gay culture we are more in tuned especially because in Bakersfield there isn’t very much pride,” said Melendez.

Melendez also noted the importance of having an event like this in Bakersfield.

“I feel like it is important having it in Bakersfield because it does much to combat the conservative nature of Kern county and I feel like it raises lots of awareness for these types of issues,” Melendez said.

Read more from South Kern Sol here.